Long before we knew that it would be called Signal, we knew what we wanted it to be. Instead of teaching the rest of the world cryptography,
we wanted to see if we could develop cryptography that worked for the rest of the world. At the time, the industry consensus was largely that
encryption and cryptography would remain unusable, but we started Signal with the idea that private communication could be simple.

Since then, we’ve made some progress. We’ve built a service used by millions, and software used by billions. The stories that make it back to
us and keep us going are the stories of people discovering each other in moments where they found they could speak freely over Signal, of people
falling in love over Signal, of people organizing ambitious plans over Signal. When we ask friends who at their workplace is on Signal and they
respond “every C-level executive, and the kitchen staff.” When we receive a subpoena for user data and have nothing to send back but a blank
sheet of paper. When we catch that glimpse of “Signal blue” on a metro commuter’s phone and smile.

By admin